The Nature Trail

Step back in time by taking a walk on the Nature Trail.

Get a glimpse of what the Conejo Valley was like before Thousand Oaks was established.

Apart from developed landscapes, the Garden also offers natural settings. On the North and West sides of the Garden is the very special Nature Trail. It leads hikers from the urban world into the world of nature. The trail travels through an area of undisturbed habitat with a small picnic area as the only addition.

Enjoy a walk through native oaks and willows,  around a chaparral hillside, and down along a streambed. It is an example of a riparian environment filled with its own animal and plant life to explore. Along the trail there are volcanic rock hideaways where coyotes and bobcats made their home. There is even a granary; oak trees with hundreds of holes used by a colony of Acorn woodpeckers to store food.

Enjoy a walk through native oaks and willows,  around a chaparral hillside, and down along a streambed. It is an example of a riparian environment filled with its own animal and plant life to explore. Along the trail there are volcanic rock hideaways where coyotes and bobcats made their home. There is even a granary; oak trees with hundreds of holes used by a colony of Acorn woodpeckers to store food.

A Nature Trail Guide and trail signs have been made possible by a grant from The Shell Oil Corporation and California Garden Clubs, Inc. Using these tools, schools groups have the opportunity to experience what the local area may have been like before modern cities sprang up and explore the delicate relationship between neighboring communities of wildflora and fauna, and modern civilization.

  In 2010 the garden received a grant from the USDA EQIP (Environmental Quality Incentives Program).  The grant was received for developing 3.2 acres below the Nature Trail and to the west of the Trail of Trees.  Three varieties of oak trees and native plants will be planted.  A few of the plants are Aesculus californica, Encelia californica, Isomeris arborea and Salvia leucophylla.   Planting is being done by volunteers.